asylum-art

Kyu-In Shim

South Korean digital artist/sculptor Kyu-In Shim forms and conceptualizes mannequin characters in a very otherworldly manner. Throughout his work, he creates beautiful themes revolving around pain, depravity, sorrow, and discomposure. His first series entitled ‘Huk Huk’ originally has two Korean meanings, ‘black’ and the ‘sound of crying’ and the two series below are labeled the ‘Bowl’ and ‘Small Space’.South Korean digital artist/sculptor Kyu-In Shim forms and conceptualizes mannequin characters in a very otherworldly manner. Throughout his work, he creates beautiful themes revolving around pain, depravity, sorrow, and discomposure. His first series entitled ‘Huk Huk’ originally has two Korean meanings, ‘black’ and the ‘sound of crying’ and the two series below are labeled the ‘Bowl’ and ‘Small Space’.

nidhoggnagar

theapplication:

nevver:

Unpaid Internships, Matt Bors (wait, there’s more)

KEEP READING!

I was just reading a thread criticizing this article where someone wrote that if Maurice Pianko “really cared” about this issue, he would do his intern justice cases pro bono. Missed the point (going pro bono would be inconsistent), but I can see the good intentions. Taking a cut of the winnings seems fair to me. This is an interesting topic, because it’s not obvious how unpaid internships are harmful until you put some thought into it… I’d prefer not to live in a world where minimum wage rules can be out-maneuvered.

maxistentialist

maxistentialist:

The Dodo:

It’s a trend that’s taken a troop of chimpanzees by storm: a blade of grass dangling from an ear. The “grass-in-ear behavior,” as scientists have termed it, seems to be one of the first times that chimpanzees have created a tradition with no discernible purpose — a primate fashion statement, in other words.  

There’s no doubt that chimpanzees have culture, as different chimp groups will use unique tools: to groom, to crack open nuts, to fish for termites.

But, according to a study in the journal Animal Cognition, chimpanzee culture now includes something that seems altogether arbitrary: ear accoutrements.

“Our observation is quite unique in the sense that nothing seems to be communicated by it,” says study author Edwin van Leeuwen, a primate expert at the Max Planck Institute in The Netherlands. 

To figure out if this was really a tradition, and not just chimpanzees sticking grass in their ears at random, van Leeuwen and his colleagues spent a year observing four chimp groups in Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage Trust, a sanctuary in Zambia. Only one troop performed the grass-in-ear behavior, although all of the chimps lived in the same grassy territory. There’s no genetic or ecological factors, the scientists believe, that would account for this behavior — only culture.

Lydia Luncz, a primatologist at the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig, Germany, who was not involved with the research, agrees. This study shows how the chimpanzees who learned to put grass in their ears did so through the “natural transmission” of new behavior, she says.

The cultural quirk first popped up in 2010 when a chimpanzee, named Julie, was spotted sporting a long-stemmed piece of grass. 

Julie acted as a role model for the other 11 chimpanzees in her group. As van Leeuwen points out, “everybody can wear rings in their ears, but you just have to come to the idea to do it.” The seven chimps who adopted the grass-in-ear tradition — and who would continue it after Julie’s death — repeatedly inspected her behavior before trying it themselves.

“The chimps would pick a piece of grass, sometimes fiddle around with it as to make the piece more to their liking, and not until then try and stick it in their ear with one hand,” van Leeuwen says. “Most of the time, the chimps let the grass hanging out of their ear during subsequent behavior like grooming and playing, sometimes for quite prolonged times. As you can imagine, this looks pretty funny.”

As silly as it may seem to us, the grass-in-ear behavior isn’t far removed from a human fad. “Any kind of subculture fad in human culture, I’d say, could be the parallel to this grass-in-ear behavior,” van Leeuwen says. “Perhaps wearing earrings or certain kinds of hats.”

wildcat2030
Boredom is not an inherent quality of the human condition, but rather it has a history, which began around the 18th century and embraced the whole Western world, and which presents an evolution from the 18th to the 21st century.

As the philosophers Barbara Dalle Pezze and Carlo Salzani put it in their essay ‘The Delicate Monster’ (2009):

The problem with too much information – Dougald Hine – Aeon

(via wildcat2030)

asylum-art

asylum-art:

Romain Laurent

Artist on Tumblr

Romain Laurent is an experimental photographer & visual artist who has worked on and been commisioned for projects by companies such as Citroen, Coca Cola & Microsoft.

Some examples of his photography.

Edit: Whereas I think Romains work is exceptionally good I feel that him as 1 individual isn’t a broad enough subject area to cover for the remaining months of the project. Therefore I will either have to include his work in another subject area or just put it down to research.